Manila-Cryptogram-bar

CRAQUEREZ, SAUKNOTEN, INCLEMENTE – these are three words from an encrypted message sent from Manila to Washington in 1898. Can a reader break this cryptogram?

NSA-Symposium-2017-bar

The biannual Symposium on Cryptologic History organized by the NSA is the most important crypto history event in the world. Here’s my report on the 2017 edition.

Kaliningrad-bar

Two years ago an encrypted bottle post was found in Kaliningrad, Russia. Can a reader break this cryptogram?

Shakespeare-Friedman-bar

William and Elizebeth Friedman, two of history’s greatest codebreakers, published a book dubunking the idea of hidden codes in the works of Shakespeare. However, the book itself contains a code. Can you find it?

Cardsharp-Caravaggio-bar

Cardsharping with steganography is a popular motive on classical paintings. Here are five examples.

Rinzi-02-solvedbar

Three weeks ago I introduced Ernest Rinzi’s encrypted journal – one of the most spectacular cryptograms I have ever seen. London-based codebreaker Tony Gaffney has now broken a large part of the cipher. Maybe a reader fluent in Italian can fill in the gaps and supply a translation.

HistoCrypt-2018b

The greatest European crypto history event ever will take place in June 2018. The Call for Papers has now been published.

Ferdinand-solved-bar

A few weeks ago I introduced two unsolved encrypted letters from the Thirty Years’ War. Scientist and blog reader Thomas Ernst has deciphered them now.

ACP212-bar

Encryption technology of the Cold War is a very interesting, yet also difficult topic. Much of the relevant information is still classified. This is also the case for a simple German encryption device named ACP 212. Does a reader know anything about it?

Yardley-Stegano-Letter-bar

In July 1918 a British officer, who was imprisoned in Turkey, sent a letter to a girl in London. This letter contains a hidden message. Can somebody help me to find out what kind of code was used?