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Only three of the many encrypted postcards I have covered on this blog so far have remained unsolved. The one I am going to introduce today might be number four.

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US artist Andy Bauch hid messages in his Lego artworks. Blog reader Christian Baumann has now solved two of the codes.

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In 1934, a US magazine published an encrypted message a reader had found in an old document. The solution is not known to me.

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Two postcards from the early 20th century are written in Morse code or something similar. One of these cryptograms is still unsolved.

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A Facebook user has posted a number of scans of a 19th century pocket lexicon with about 80 pages of code in it. Can a reader solve it?

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The Museum für Kommunikation in Frankfurt owns a cipher tool from the 19th century. Not much is known about it. Can a reader find out more?

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US artist Andy Bauch has created Lego mosaics that encode money in BitCoins and other crypto-currencies. Can a reader break his codes?

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A medal that is depicted in a Freemason document from 1952 bears two encrypted inscriptions. Can a reader decipher them?

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English actress Diana Dors left behind an encrypted message. This cryptogram allegedly leads to two million pounds.

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The Playfair cipher is an encryption method from the 19th century. Some say that a Playfair-encrypted message of 50 or less letters is still secure today, if the method is used properly. Let’s put this claim to the test.