The Bank of England has announced that Enigma cryptanalyst Alan Turing will appear on the new £50 banknote.

Blog reader Magnus Ekhall has created a software that simulates an Enigma breaking device. He has also published a few challenges, one of which is still unsolved.

The German radio station WDR5 has aired a report about Enigma spy Hans-Thilo Schmidt. Among the experts quoted are Dermot Turing and me.

The Polish city of  Poznań offers a number of interesting Enigma sights. Now, a new one is planned: an Enigma information center. Suggestions from my readers on how this place might look like are highly welcome.

German mathematician Dr. Heinrich Döring was one of the most brilliant codebreakers of the Second World War. Does a reader know what happened to him after 1945?

In various parts of London and in many other English cities kerbstones bear enigmatic markings. This kerbstone code has yet to be deciphered.

Crypto expert Elonka Dunin has discovered a steganographic message on the tombstone of William and Elizebeth Friedman.

On Friday the Heinz Nixdorf Museum will broadcast a number of radio messages encrypted with an Enigma. Codebreaking experts in Bletchley Park will try to decipher these cryptograms with WW2 technology. Enigma experts will try the same with computer support.

Two researchers have introduced new techniques for breaking Enigma messages. Using these techniques they have deciphered hitherto unsolved Enigma cryptograms from World War II.

The Reihenschieber was a simple encryption device used by the Germans in the Cold War. I built a model of it with Lego bricks. Can you solve an encrypted text I produced with it?