Rinzi-02-solvedbar

Three weeks ago I introduced Ernest Rinzi’s encrypted journal – one of the most spectacular cryptograms I have ever seen. London-based codebreaker Tony Gaffney has now broken a large part of the cipher. Maybe a reader fluent in Italian can fill in the gaps and supply a translation.

Ferdinand-solved-bar

A few weeks ago I introduced two unsolved encrypted letters from the Thirty Years’ War. Scientist and blog reader Thomas Ernst has deciphered them now.

Devils-Letter-bar

A 17th-century Italian nun claimed that the Devil had dictated an encrypted letter to her. Scientists have now allegedly broken this cryptogram. Details are not known yet.

St-Nicholas-bar

Some of the crypto mysteries I recently introduced on this blog were quite tough. As a change, here are a few easier ones from a 19th century children’s magazine.

Sacco-Notebook-bar

Italian cryptologist Luigi Sacco left behind a text encrypted with a Fleissner grille. Paolo Bonavoglia and Bart Wenmeckers, both readers of this blog, solved it.

Censorship-solved-bar

In a British censorship manual from WW2 two pictures containing hidden messages are displayed. My readers have now found at least a part of the solutions.

Telegram-Telaviv-solved-bar

Three weeks ago I blogged about an encrypted telegram that was sent from New York to Tel Aviv in 1948. This cryptogram has now been solved.

Baring-Gould-Wenmeckers-bar

Blog reader Bart Wenmeckers has solved a 19th century cryptogram I recently introduced with Hill Climbing. A few diagrams he provided give me the chance to explain how this powerful technique works.

Klaus-Tappeiner-Tengri-137

“Who can solve this encrypted book?”, I asked five weeks ago. Blog reader Klaus Tappeiner from South Tyrol, Italy, could. His solution of the Tengri 137 cryptogram is absolutely ingenious.

Dellschau-2-bar

Charles Dellschau (1830-1923) was a US outsider artist, who left behind fascinating paintings. Some of these contain encrypted texts.