So-called “prosumers” in today’s web 2.0 mindset will increasingly expect companies as well as research institutions to open up for a true dialogue with the public. The demand for transparency and a direct, unmediated discourse is fundamentally changing the way enterprises and organizations communicate about science and innovation. As much as social media might shake the business foundations of the publishing industry to the core and as much as it may alter journalism as we know it, there is also a high potential of bringing the society back into science and innovation. Especially when it comes to potentially controversial technological developments, the right public discourse may create transparency and thus build up trust in innovation, promote general readiness for technological change and accordingly accelerate the diffusion of new products in the market. Since media images of public debates tend to be afflicted by a high degree of complexity, new visualization methods and new journalistic skills are needed. Therefore the author suggests an interaction model for future innovation communication that addresses the demand for public discourse in all four stages of the value chain: science, ideation, innovation and diffusion.

And here is my second presentation, given at Stanford University, today:

Kommentare (2)

  1. #1 Alexander Gerber
    23. Juni 2010

    Thanks also for dozens of comments to a blog posting on this subject right here:
    http://tinyurl.com/innokomm28

    (more than 100 comments overall, but also quite a lot of spam in between)

    http://www.blog.mediaforscience.eu/post/2010/05/13/From-Peer-Review-to-Crowd-Review.aspx#comment

  2. #2 frisco tx homes for sale
    13. März 2011

    Keep up the great work with this blog…i have enjoyed reading it.