An old newspaper article mentions a Czech cipher machine from the 1920s. Can a reader find out more about this device?

The Enigma documentary I introduced on this blog last year is now available in German and Spanish. Any feedback from readers of this blog is welcome.

“The Imitation Game”, starring Benedict Cumberbatch, is one of the most popular movies that features cryptography. Unfortunately, it contains many historical errors.

Crypto collector Ralph Simpson is compiling a list of all Kryha machines that are known to exist. Can my readers support him?

A hundred years ago, German textile engineer Rudolf Zschweigert invented a remarkable encryption machine. A paper I recently published gives an introduction to this device.

No footage taken at Bletchley Park during WW2 is known to exist. However, an eleven-minute silent film recorded at an outstation nearby has now been published.

The picture series I introduced in my last post contains a photograph of a 1930s electronic machine. It seems completely unknown how it was used and if it was a cipher machine at all.

Edward Hebern was a bustling, yet successless constructor of cipher machines. The Smithsonian Institution has put a number of photos of these devices into the public domain.

Today I visited the USS Pampanito, a museum u-boat at Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco. I was especially interested in the encryption machine that is allegedly on display on this ship. My trip ended up as a disappointment.

A Munich auction house is going to sell an SG-41 (Hitler mill) at auction. Blog reader Markus Sperl has been on site and has provided me a few pictures of the machine.